JavaScript does not have any built-in directives like some other programming languages (e.g., C++ or Python) that provide special instructions to the compiler or interpreter. However, JavaScript does have a set of statements, declarations, and annotations that serve specific purposes. Here are some commonly used constructs that can be considered as "directives" in JavaScript:

  1. "use strict": The "use strict" directive enables strict mode in JavaScript, which enforces stricter parsing and error handling. It helps to catch common coding mistakes and improves code quality.

    javascript
    'use strict'; // Strict mode code goes here
  2. "require" and "import": These are not directives in the strict sense, but they are used for importing modules in JavaScript. Depending on the environment (Node.js or modern browsers), you can use either "require" or "import" to import and use functionality from other JavaScript modules.

    javascript
    // CommonJS (Node.js) syntax const fs = require('fs'); // ES modules (modern browsers, or with appropriate transpilation) import { fetchData } from './api.js';
  3. "#pragma": Although not a standard JavaScript directive, some transpilers or preprocessors, such as Babel, support a "#pragma" directive for configuring specific behaviors or enabling certain features during the transpilation process. The exact usage and supported options may vary depending on the tool.

    javascript
    // Babel pragma directive // Enable a specific Babel plugin or behavior /* #pragma babel-plugin-name [options] */
  4. "//# sourceMappingURL": This directive is used to specify the source map file for debugging purposes. It helps map the minified or transpiled code back to its original source code for easier debugging.

    javascript
    //# sourceMappingURL=script.min.js.map

It's important to note that JavaScript is a dynamic and loosely typed language, and it doesn't have a concept of directives in the same way as other languages. However, the constructs mentioned above serve specific purposes and are often referred to as directives due to their unique roles or behaviors.

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